Monday, January 25, 2016

Simmering Time

I've just finished up revising a draft of a story that I think has the potential I want. It's not there yet, but it's SO much closer than it was.

It was fun going through this draft with notes from some crit buddies with specific goals in mind.

It was also fun coming across some lines/sections that made me smile. It's great when you come across something you'd forgotten about and you're able to think -- hey, that's pretty good stuff you've got there!

Now, I'll let this simmer for a bit while I do the same for another story.

How about you? Do you need that simmering time, or are you able to look at a story right away after you've done one round of revising/editing?

50 comments:

  1. we do love it when we amaze ourselves :) While I'm translating I will often think it is an utter mess, but when I reread it whole in the end it all looks well

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  2. I tend to need simmering time. Otherwise, I tend to gloss over things because I know it too well to read it as thoroughly as it needs. And I absolutely love that feeling you mention. Good luck!

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    1. That's exactly the problem I have! Tough to spot the errors

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  3. So awesome you finished your draft. That's a great accomplishment. Yes, letting the story sit for awhile can be helpful.

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  4. It's always interesting to go back and revisit something you've wrote and put aside. For me, it's a great way to see a new perspective of it. Good luck on your next story revisit.

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    1. I'm always looking for that perspective - I'm not good at spotting it independently :)

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  5. Those moments when you go back and think it was really good... and then you wonder who the heck wrote it!

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  6. I would rather have time to simmer, but I don't seem to these days. :(

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  7. I just finished the first draft of a novel on Saturday when we were snowed in. So I'm in simmering mode too. I also have another book that I'm going to edit before I go back to it.

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    1. I try to switch between stories too - helps clear the cobwebs!

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  8. I like those moments. "Did I really write that?" Of course, I often also say, "Please tell me I didn't write that."

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    1. I definitely have those moments too! :)

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    2. Guess if we do it enough we'll come up with some decent stories. Let's hope so. :-)

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  9. Hey Jemi,

    I never read my own stuff. I'd fall asleep from the sheer boredom of it all.

    I let the dog do all the simmering. Writing is just a bit of farcical fun, a bit of reflection, a bit of therapy. Nothing more than that for this, um, smug amateur.

    I'm going now, eh!

    Gary :)

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    1. And that's exactly the way it should be! I think all writers (smug amateurs or no) find writing therapeutic at some level or another! :)
      #arf

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  10. Congrats on feeling good about some of that writing!

    I do both. I often do several read throughs to work on various aspects. But from rough draft to first revisions I take a break. I also take breaks as I wait to see what beta readers have to say and/or to let a manuscript sit after a big revision.

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    1. Yes - those are perfect times for me to take a break as well! :)

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    2. How is the revision feeling now?

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    3. It's coming along! The hero's pov sections are much stronger than the heroine's though - so I've got my work cut out for me! :)

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  11. Usually I let my story simmer before giving it an editing pass. Then I simmer it again while my CPs read it. And then when I get the critiques back, I read the critiques and let those simmer too. Especially if they're asking for book-wide changes that I'll need to work in.

    In short, I simmer a LOT. :-D

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    1. yes! those critiques are definitely pause times for me as well. I like to let my subconscious handle as much as possible! :)

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  12. Yay, that's awesome that your revisions are going well! I definitely need to give my stories time to simmer. It helps me gain a new perspective on them.

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  13. I didn't used to be able to dive right in, but in recent years (with deadlines) I find it's a necessity. Best to stay on top of things while it's fresh on the brain for me.

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    1. I'm getting better at needing less time, but I still do better with at least a couple of months :)

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    2. At least a couple. If not a year. The more time the better, but sometimes we don't have that luxury.

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  14. Hope it turns out all the better for it Jemi.

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  15. I think simmering time is crucial. I'm excited to think your story may soon be coming out into the world. When I re-read a manuscript of mine and a section made me cry, I was stoked! Really?

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    1. That's awesome!
      I'm hoping they'll be out in a year or so - I want to have a few ready to go!! :)

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  16. I'm currently editing one book that I finished the first draft a year ago. After I finished writing it, I was too busy with my book deals to edit it. It had a very nice vacation. Even sent me a postcard or too. lol

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    1. I bet that postcard had all kinds of editing tips for you! :)

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  17. I always appreciate having time to put a manuscript away and let it rest before editing!

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  18. I feel impatient waiting for the ms to simmer, but I do try to wait a while before editing (mostly because my co-author, Stephanie, tells me we have to wait) so I can look at everything with fresh eyes. I do love when I forget about certain lines or when things happens so I can be surprised. :)

    Happy editing and simmering!
    ~Jess

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    1. Thanks!
      Sounds like you and Stephanie have a great system!

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  19. I always put one manuscript away and pull out another, taking turns with them as one simmers.

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    1. That system works for me as well! Love having 2 stories on the go :)

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  20. Shimmering time is definitely needed.

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  21. I always let my WiPs simmer after every draft and every editing pass.

    Best of luck with edits!

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    1. Me too! It's the only way I can clear my memory a bit!

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  22. Jemi! How ArE you??? It's been forever and a million days! I've just returned to the blogosphere after 4 years... yes, 4 years. I hope you remember me!

    I'm so glad to see you still active on here, and thrilled about your edits coming along.

    I always need some times away from my MS to come back to it with fresh eyes :)

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    1. So nice to see you again!!!! :)
      I do remember you - and I'm glad you're out and about again - off to see you at your place!

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  23. Congrats on those revisions.
    Having more than one project going is a good way to keep busy and look at it this way, you'll never be bored!

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    1. I do that! It's awesome to be able to switch as needed! :)

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